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“You yourself, as much as anybody in the entire universe, deserve your love and affection.” —Buddha

If you were to study your immune system – the way your body defends itself from attack – you would see proteins, cells and organs working together to fight off unwanted intruders.

In the main, people are with born intact immune systems and develop a stronger immune system as we grow older and gain greater exposure to toxins, viruses, bacteria and fungi.

However, sometimes our immune systems are not as robust as we’d like. There are many things you may be experiencing which indicate that your immune system is not working as well as it can.

These include:

  • You’ve been diagnosed with cancer, particularly blood cancers like leukaemia, and are having chemotherapy
  • You have a chronic disease such as diabetes, hepatitis or kidney disease
  • You have a congenital disorder such as Down’s syndrome, cerebral palsy or cystic fibrosis
  • You’re living with an autoimmune disease which often mean your immune system is overactive
  • You’re taking some medications, including corticosteroids
  • Being unwell frequently
  • Ailments such as frequent headaches or migraines

Other factors also come in to play in affecting your immune system:

  • Spending too little time in the sun, and not having enough Vitamin D (this is definitely an issue in the UK)
  • Having a sedentary lifestyle – not moving around enough every day
  • Aging, being pregnant or being obese
  • Using antibiotics
  • Feeling isolated and lonely
  • Poor nutrition, smoking and drinking too much
  • Smoking and excessive alcohol consumption
  • Overtraining and the wrong types of training
  • Environmental pollutants
  • Lack of emotional resilience

But what can you do if you feel like your immune system is weaker than you’d like? We think the answer is simple: start by being kind to yourself and others.

Be kind to yourself

  • You are what you eat so make sure you’re supporting your immune system with everything you put in your mouth. Please be kind to yourself and eat whole foods and a nutrient dense diet.
  • Up your intake of protein, especially plant based proteins like nuts, seeds and legumes. You can also try tempeh and tofu from non GMO soy as that has extremely high protein concentrations
  • Refined sugars supress your immune system for hours after you eat them so avoid sugar and refined starches and watch your overall health improve
  • Remember to eat colourful fruits and vegetables – particularly leafy greens, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, peppers, sweet potatoes and squashes.  These are packed with nutrients which support your immune system.  When you’re making soups, sauces, dips and vegetable dishes, cook with onions, ginger, garlic and loads of spices.  These have great properties and taste delicious too
  • Put probiotics on your shopping list as they will support your immunity. Look out for sauerkraut, kefir, tempeh, kimchi, miso and unsweetened yogurt as well as prebiotic food like asparagus, plantains, flax seeds, seaweed, bananas and apples
  • Drink plenty of pure water and other fluids, especially soups and broths. Cook from scratch if you can. Choose ginger and turmeric tea but avoid concentrated fruit juices and other sugary drinks
  • Make sure you’re getting enough sleep – ideally seven or eight hours a night. If you find it hard to destress, try mindfulness, yoga, active relaxation and breathing techniques throughout the day
  • Exercise when you are feeling well but avoid if you feel run down. Try for 30 – 45 minutes per day
  • Create a toxic and electropollution- free house environment as much as possible!
  • Build emotional resilience through meditation and other heart-based techniques
  • Spend time in nature every day
  • Stay connected with the people you love
  • Learn to breath and oxygenate your body properly by retraining your respiratory centre
Be kind to others

The ultimate source of a happy life is warm-heartedness. This means extending to others the kind of concern we have for ourselves. On a simple level we find that if we have a compassionate heart we naturally have more friends. And scientists today are discovering that while anger and hatred eat into our immune system, warm-heartedness and compassion are good for our health.” – Dalai Lama

We’ve long known that you receive when you give, and that wonderful feeling of love, affection, warmth and connection produces so-called kindness hormones.

Research has shown that oxytocin (a kindness hormone) is tied to making us more friendly, trusting and generous as well as lowering our blood pressure and giving our hormone levels a boost.

Scientists have found that when you’re doing more kindnesses, you’ll be less stressed.  Even experiencing stress in these times kindness helps build resilience and takes the edge off.

So, as a starting step, be kind to yourself and be kind to others and watch your immune system get stronger every day.

If you found this article useful and would like to find out how to incorporate some of the advice in your daily life, you can book a FREE 20 minute telephone consultation on this link.

 

WOULD YOU LIKE TO HAVE FEWER TOXINS IN YOUR BODY?

Toxins are unfortunately an inescapable part of daily modern life.

Though you’re probably already eating 100% organic, drinking your tap water filtered and using non-toxic beauty and cleaning products, you will still have a significant amount of metals and environmental toxins in your body.

In this blog we will look at some of the things you can do to minimise the impact of these toxins on your body, wellness and health.

Think about lifestyle choices to keep your colon healthy

Your colon is also called the large intestine or large bowel.  Once your food is digested in the small intestine, minerals and vitamins are removed. After that, what remains is taken to the colon where water is removed, and bacteria breaks down the food so it can leave your body.

As you’d expect, top of the list to keep your colon healthy is staying active. This keeps your entire body healthy including your colon.

Now we move on to diet.

You already know that you need to cut back on sugar, limit eating processed meat and go for whole grains when you can.

We encourage you to eat the rainbow with a range of colourful fruit and vegetables in your diet every day.  Key amongst these suggestions is broccoli, dark, leafy greens, almond milk, oatmeal and raspberries.  Why? Well, they have high amounts of fibre, Vitamin D and calcium.

Fibre is really important to your overall health.  This can’t be broken down by enzymes in your digestive system, so it moves food throughout the system and helps cleanse the colon through regular bowel movements.

Did you know there are two type of fibre? Water – soluble and water- insoluble.  Soluble fibre absorbs water during digestion. Foods which fits in to this category is called “roughage” – and includes

  • oats and oat bran
  • pears
  • apples
  • avocados
  • blackberries
  • vegetables
  • legumes
  • barley

 

Insoluble fibre doesn’t change during digestion, so helps move food through your intestines. This kind of fibre can be found in:

  • fruits with edible skin or seeds
  • vegetables
  • whole-grain breads, pastas, and crackers
  • bulgur wheat
  • stone ground corn meal
  • cereals
  • bran
  • rolled oats
  • buckwheat
  • brown rice

 

Ensure an anti-inflammatory diet

It’s important that your diet minimises toxic exposure and helps your body detoxify regularly.

Thanks to soil, water and air contamination, organic food you buy these days still contain toxins but are likely to reduce your overall toxicity burden as they’ve not been produced with antibiotics, hormones or pesticides.

If you are being mindful when you eat, and conscious of the effects that various foods have on you, you might also have realised that some foods trigger an inflammatory response in you. These food sensitivities or intolerances can keep your immune system in a state of high alert, fuelling inflammation throughout your body.  Gluten, dairy, soy, egg and corn are common culprits.

Tame and reduce inflammation using supplements

Research has shown that taking recommended supplements can tame and reverse inflammation.

These include:

  • Resveratrol
  • Curcumin
  • N-acetyl-cysteine
  • Cordyceps
  • Gotu Kola
  • Milk thistle
  • L-glutamine
  • Alpha lipoic acid

 

Use “binders”

There are also some compounds you can take that will bind with the toxins within your body and remove them.  These so-called binders will help remove fungal infections, infectious bacteria, environmental toxins, mycotoxins and heavy metals from your body.

Some binders include:

  • Modified citrus pectin
  • Activated charcoal
  • Bentonite clay
  • Zeolite
  • Chlorella
  • Silica

 

Breathe easy

Oxygenating your body, and retraining the respiratory centre, is key to having fewer toxins in your body as proper breathing directly affects your lymphatic system – the “sewerage” system of your body.

Toxicity, bad nutrition and stress lead to bad breathing habits which in turn lowers the oxygenation of your body’s organs and tissues.

Address this and you will see the results in a day or two. You’ll need less sleep, less food and will have more energy and vitality.

You can further support toxin elimination by making sure your liver and gallbladder function are supported, that your bowel is in peak condition for healthy elimination and that you’re hydrated and taking care of your bladder and kidneys.

Colon hydrotherapy

Colon hydrotherapy is believed to remove toxins from the colon.  During the colon hydrotherapy, a tube is placed in your rectum and water is flushed through the colon. You can also use juice fasts and cleanses to detox your body and cleanse your colon.

Don’t forget to regularly exercise to stimulate your lymphatic system and sweat regularly to keep those toxins flowing out.

Did you find this article useful?

Adhere to these suggestions and you’ll be able to minimise the toxin build up in your body.

If you found this article useful and would like to find out how to incorporate some of the advice in your daily life, you can book a free 20 minute telephone consultation on this link.

Part of being healthy is wanting to engage fully in your life, but tiredness can get in the way of this – leaving you feeling demotivated and down in the dumps.

Sometimes it’s natural to feel very tired if, for example, you’ve been up late working on a new side hustle, are worried about a stressful conversation you need to have with your boss the next day,  or are feeding a small baby. But if you are constantly feeling tired and there’s no obvious cause, this can be very worrying.

With constant feelings of exhaustion, life becomes exceedingly difficult.  Stresses and worries build up, and that only hinders the amount and quality of sleep you get. So it’s wise to get to the root of why you’re feeling tired so you can work on resolving it before it snowballs into other problems which are harder to fix.

Why could you be feeling tired?

We’ve seen significant research that shows chronic low grade inflammation can hinder activity in the areas of the brain which are responsible for motivation.  These areas rely on dopamine to work properly.  This is the brain chemical responsible for motivation, drive and a sense of self-worth.

Your body deploys white blood cells, the chemicals from which protect you from bacteria and viruses.   This process is called inflammation and it raises the blood flow to the affected area.  However, sometimes your immune systems triggers this process when there are no invaders to battle.   This inflammation can last for hours or days or even months or years.

When the body is suffering from chronic inflammation, it seems as if there’s an injury or illness present. So, the brain lowers drive and motivation – and the link between work and effort to reward – and keeps all its energy for healing. Suddenly, everyday tasks, goals and dreams feel out of reach.  You feel fatigued, drained and depleted and daily tasks feel impossible to achieve.

We are seeing a lot of these issues at the moment, as well as a lot of the other chronic inflammatory disorders like heart disease, obesity, diabetes, autoimmune disease and cancer.

Tired all the time? This could be why…

  • If you’re eating too much sugar and processed carbs this is a huge source of chronic inflammation.
  • Food can also be the problem if you’re gluten intolerant or consuming pro-inflammatory foods such as canola oil, soyabean oil and hydrogenated fats
  • Lack of some foods and nutrients is also an issue. Are you low in fibre? If so, bad gut bacteria and healthy microbes are pro-inflammatory and pro-disease. If you don’t have sufficient iodine, vitamin D, selenium, zinc, omega-3 fats and vitamin A then this may affect your thyroid and more
  • Are you stuck in front of a screen all day? If your job doesn’t have a physical component and you lack regular physical activity, this is a common source of chronic inflammation
  • Modern life: we live in a toxic soup of plastics, car exhausts, chemically laden beauty products and foods.  All this, plus artificial light confuses our biorhythms and triggers inflammation
  • Geopathic stress: Are you being affected by electropollution from pylons, Wi-Fi, mobile masts etc?
  • Is there a problem with your thyroid? When your environment is toxic, as with the example above, your thyroid is often the first thing to be affected
  • Stressed? Depression, anxiety and stress are so high these days, and that’s well known to trigger inflammation – especially when you’re living with a long term condition

You don’t have to feel like this (physically or mentally)

You may feel bad that you often seem unable to get through the day without feeling exhausted.  With motivation levels low and fatigue levels high, you may also feel as if your doctor or other medical professionals have not taken your feelings seriously.  This is a recognised problem with conventional medicine, and it seems that women are disproportionately affected in these cases.   We understand and we’re here to help.

Feeling lazy and demotivated?

It’s important to remember that feeling “lazy” and “demotivated” can be symptoms of a larger more underlying problem. It may be that there are elements of your life and lifestyle that you can change which will address this and help constant tiredness become a thing of the past.

If you found this article useful and would like to find out how to incorporate some of the advice in your daily life, you can book a free 20 minute telephone consultation on this link.

According to recent research, approximately 1 in 5 people in the UK have low vitamin D levels (defined as serum levels below 25 nmol/L).

That’s because your body creates Vitamin D from direct sunlight on the skin when you’re outdoors.  But when you are in the sun during the summer, you’re likely to be following doctor’s advice to wear sunscreen which can block Vitamin D production.

Then, between October and early March, you may well not get enough vitamin D from sunlight even with no sunscreen.  In addition to that, even when you’re spending time outside in daylight during both the winter and summer months, you aren’t exposing ourselves to adequate levels of vitamin D, in contrast to a country with a warmer climate.

Vitamin D in food

Did you know you can also find Vitamin D in a small number of foods, including the following?

  • oily fish – such as salmon, sardines, herring and mackerel
  • red meat
  • liver
  • egg yolks
  • fortified foods – such as some fat spreads and breakfast cereals

In the UK, cows’ milk is generally not a good source of vitamin D because it is not fortified.

How do you know if you may be Vitamin D deficient?

If you’re living with any of these issues at the moment, you may have a Vitamin D deficiency:

  1. Ongoing musculoskeletal pain and achy bones. This may have been diagnosed as fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue syndrome.
  2. Frequent illness/infections— including colds and flu
  3. Neurological symptoms— including depression
  4. Fatigue and daytime sleepiness
  5. Head sweating

This is particularly likely if you:

  • Rarely spend time outdoors and/or always wear sunscreen
  • Have darker skin (which acts as a natural sunscreen)
  • Are 50 or older (your skin won’t make as much Vitamin D naturally)
  • Are obese or have gastrointestinal problems – as vitamin D is fat soluble

Vitamin D can protect you against a range of issues

Vitamin D can have a powerful effect on health and plays its part in protecting you against the following:

  • Dry eye syndromes
  • Macular degeneration
  • Autoimmune, gastrointestinal, rheumatic and infectious diseases
  • Osteoporosis
  • Cardiovascular health
  • Neurological diseases
  • Lupus
  • Sleep apnoea
  • Obesity
  • Diabetes
  • Issues with a compromised immune system
  • Pregnancy complications

Can Vitamin D stop you getting Coronavirus?

According to the NHS there have been some news reports about Vitamin D reducing the risk of coronavirus as it helps strengthen the immune system. However, there is currently not enough evidence to support this.

How do you know if you need a Vitamin D3 boost?

We can help you measure and boost your Vitamin D3 levels with the use of a medical device.

At your appointment, we will go through a short questionnaire so we understand more about your overall health and can advise you accordingly.

We will then help you prepare your finger so we can do an accurate finger prick test to get your blood.  Within 15 minutes your results will be ready, or we can email them to you.   Then we’ll be able to evaluate your results and recommend the most appropriate Vitamin D3 supplements and dosage for you if necessary.

At this time, you can also choose to have a BioResonance scan to determine the underlying causes of your health problems.

Now you don’t need to worry about your Vitamin D levels – book an appointment with us. Knowledge is power after all!

BOOK YOUR VITAMIN D3 TEST NOW

“Kostas is a marvellous holistic practitioner and motivator whose passion, commitment and dedication to his practice shines through. He was able to get to the root of physical problems, offered me excellent practical and nutritional advice and was able to direct me to appropriate products that would support me on my journey back to health. The most important thing was I felt empowered to make the changes. MANY THANKS!

– Sarah Peachock”