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Monday - Friday

9am - 7pm

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Sunday

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Light Centre , 9 Eccleston Street, London, SW1W 9LX

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London Natural Health Centre, 46 Theobalds Road, London, WC1X 8NW

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So many people we see in the clinic struggle with the effects of poor sleep. We want to talk to you about why good sleep is so important and how you can go about getting it!

A good night’s sleep is as important to health as eating the right things and exercising. Your physical and emotional well-being depends on getting enough. Yet we’re living in sleep-deprived times. Some people are even competitive about how little sleep they’re getting, like dragging yourself through the day on four hours’ rest is a badge of honour. Scientists even say we’re now getting an hour or two less sleep each night than we were 60 years ago. And the effect on our bodies is not good.

The amount of sleep each person needs varies. Waking up feeling refreshed in the morning is a good indicator and so is being able to wake without an alarm. If you need an alarm to wake up, you are not getting enough sleep. If you don’t get enough sleep, you may not be able to concentrate properly and become irritable or agitated. You may also have blurred vision, be clumsy, become disorientated or slow to respond, and have decreased motivation. And, on top of that, if you’re tired and cranky, you are significantly less likely to make the best food choices.

You might be surprised to learn that, in a computer-simulated driving test, those who had had just a few hours of sleep were more dangerous on the (virtual) road than the people who had had a few drinks! In fact, the majority of road accidents are caused by tiredness.

The purpose of sleep is to rest and recover – and to allow the body to repair itself. These maintenance and repair processes take 7 to 9 hours. Adults need between 7 and 9 hours per night – regardless of what you think you have trained yourself to get by with.

But just how do you get a good night’s sleep?

The most common cause of insomnia is a change in your daily routine. For example, travelling, changes in work hours, disruption of other behaviours (eating, exercise, leisure, etc.), and relationship conflicts can all cause sleep problems. Establishing good sleep hygiene is the most important thing you can do to maintain good sleep. It might also be helpful to keep a sleep diary to help pinpoint any particular problems.

DO

  • Try to go to bed at the same time every day. Your body thrives on routine.
  • Keep the temperature in your bedroom comfortable; not too hot, nor too cold.
  • Use your bed only for sleep and sex. This may help you completely switch off.
  • Keep the bedroom completely dark, so you’re not disturbed by light, which your brain detects even when your eyes are closed. Eye masks can be useful.
  • Spend time outdoors to soak up the sun.
  • Try to take some gentle exercise every There is evidence that regular exercise improves restful sleep. This includes stretching and aerobic exercise. A brisk walk ticks both boxes.
  • Make an effort to relax for at least 5 minutes before going to bed – a warm bath, massage, meditation.
  • Keep your feet and hands Wear warm socks and/or mittens or gloves to bed.
  • Consider getting a traditional alarm clock so your smartphone can stay out of the bedroom (see below). Better still, work out how much sleep you need by going to bed 15 minutes earlier until you find that you wake up naturally before your alarm. That’s your personal sleep requirement.

DON’T…

  • Engage in stimulating activities – like playing a competitive game, watching an edge-of-the-seat film, or having an important conversation with a loved Even using smartphones and tablets can interfere with sleep, because they emit the same kind of light as the morning sun.
  • Eat a heavy meal within four hours of going to bed.
  • Drink caffeine after lunch – like coffee, ‘normal’ and green tea, and
  • Use alcohol to help you Alcohol can make sleep more disturbed.
  • Go to bed too hungry. Have a snack before bed – a glass of milk or banana is ideal.
  • Try to avoid daytime naps.
  • Try not to get frustrated if you can’t sleep. Go to bed in a positive mood – “I will sleep tonight”.

 

If you’re not sure where to start, take the first step today by booking your free 30-minute Health and Energy Review, so we can talk about your health concerns and I
can give you some energy-boosting strategies you can use straight away. If this sounds like what you need – link here.

According to recent research, approximately 1 in 5 people in the UK have low vitamin D levels (defined as serum levels below 25 nmol/L).

That’s because your body creates Vitamin D from direct sunlight on the skin when you’re outdoors.  But when you are in the sun during the summer, you’re likely to be following doctor’s advice to wear sunscreen which can block Vitamin D production.

Then, between October and early March, you may well not get enough vitamin D from sunlight even with no sunscreen.  In addition to that, even when you’re spending time outside in daylight during both the winter and summer months, you aren’t exposing ourselves to adequate levels of vitamin D, in contrast to a country with a warmer climate.

Vitamin D in food

Did you know you can also find Vitamin D in a small number of foods, including the following?

  • oily fish – such as salmon, sardines, herring and mackerel
  • red meat
  • liver
  • egg yolks
  • fortified foods – such as some fat spreads and breakfast cereals

In the UK, cows’ milk is generally not a good source of vitamin D because it is not fortified.

How do you know if you may be Vitamin D deficient?

If you’re living with any of these issues at the moment, you may have a Vitamin D deficiency:

  1. Ongoing musculoskeletal pain and achy bones. This may have been diagnosed as fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue syndrome.
  2. Frequent illness/infections— including colds and flu
  3. Neurological symptoms— including depression
  4. Fatigue and daytime sleepiness
  5. Head sweating

This is particularly likely if you:

  • Rarely spend time outdoors and/or always wear sunscreen
  • Have darker skin (which acts as a natural sunscreen)
  • Are 50 or older (your skin won’t make as much Vitamin D naturally)
  • Are obese or have gastrointestinal problems – as vitamin D is fat soluble

Vitamin D can protect you against a range of issues

Vitamin D can have a powerful effect on health and plays its part in protecting you against the following:

  • Dry eye syndromes
  • Macular degeneration
  • Autoimmune, gastrointestinal, rheumatic and infectious diseases
  • Osteoporosis
  • Cardiovascular health
  • Neurological diseases
  • Lupus
  • Sleep apnoea
  • Obesity
  • Diabetes
  • Issues with a compromised immune system
  • Pregnancy complications

Can Vitamin D stop you getting Coronavirus?

According to the NHS there have been some news reports about Vitamin D reducing the risk of coronavirus as it helps strengthen the immune system. However, there is currently not enough evidence to support this.

How do you know if you need a Vitamin D3 boost?

We can help you measure and boost your Vitamin D3 levels with the use of a medical device.

At your appointment, we will go through a short questionnaire so we understand more about your overall health and can advise you accordingly.

We will then help you prepare your finger so we can do an accurate finger prick test to get your blood.  Within 15 minutes your results will be ready, or we can email them to you.   Then we’ll be able to evaluate your results and recommend the most appropriate Vitamin D3 supplements and dosage for you if necessary.

At this time, you can also choose to have a BioResonance scan to determine the underlying causes of your health problems.

Now you don’t need to worry about your Vitamin D levels – book an appointment with us. Knowledge is power after all!

BOOK YOUR VITAMIN D3 TEST NOW

“Kostas is a marvellous holistic practitioner and motivator whose passion, commitment and dedication to his practice shines through. He was able to get to the root of physical problems, offered me excellent practical and nutritional advice and was able to direct me to appropriate products that would support me on my journey back to health. The most important thing was I felt empowered to make the changes. MANY THANKS!

– Sarah Peachock”