Category Archives: Physical Health

Dr. Buteyko’s Discovery

Russian scientist and medical doctor Konstantin Buteyko, in 1952, discovered that the real cause of asthma and other related diseases is a radical depletion of CO2 – carbon dioxide – in the lungs. This isn’t so strange when we learn that oxygen cannot be assimilated by cells without adequate amounts of CO2. There is only 0.03% carbon dioxide in the atmosphere today. Yet to absorb oxygen a healthy body requires about 6.5% carbon dioxide in the alveoli of the lungs. Therefore your lungs act to trap in some of the carbon dioxide produced by your body. Should the level of carbon dioxide in human lungs fall to 3%, it is fatal.

“Carbon dioxide is the basic nutrition of every life form of earth.

It acts as the main regulator of all functions in the organism;

it is the main internal environment of the organism; it is the vitamin of all vitamins.”

  • – KP Buteyko

According to Buteyko’s research, asthmatics and sufferers of other related conditions have adopted a breathing pattern which causes them to release more carbon dioxide than they produce. To prevent the level from dropping to far, the body has developed certain defence mechanisms. These include constriction of the bronchial muscles and increased production of mucus in the membranes of the breathing passages.

Signs of overbreathing are lightheadedness, dizziness, poor concentration, shortness of breath, over sensitivity of the airways, excessive production of mucus, blocked or runny nose, mouth breathing, palpitations, skipped heart beats, muscular spasms, different degrees of anxiety, tension, apprehension, fatigue, insomnia, abdominal bloating, loss of consciousness, and the list goes on!

 

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Spleen is Very Important to Immune System


The spleen is located on the left side of the abdomen. The spleen can be considered as two organs in one; it filters the blood and removes abnormal cells (such as old and defective red blood cells), and it makes disease-fighting components of the immune system (including antibodies and lymphocytes/white cells).

The body of the spleen appears red and pulpy, surrounded by a tough capsule. The red pulp consists of blood vessels (splenic sinusoids) interwoven with connective tissue (splenic cords). The red pulp filters the blood and removes old and defective blood cells. The white pulp is inside the red pulp, and consists of little lumps of lymphoid tissue. Antibodies are made inside the white pulp. Similarly to other organs of the lymphatic system, particular immune cells (B lymphocytes and T lymphocytes) and blood cells are either made or matured inside the spleen. Blood enters the spleen via the splenic artery, which subdivides into many tiny branches. Each branch is encased in a clump of lymphocytes, which means every drop of blood is filtered for foreign particles as it enters the spleen.

The Naturopathic or Chinese view of the spleen is very important when it comes to immunity, as you can see from the information above. Therefore ‘strong’ spleen energy keeps the body vibrant and with a strong immune system/defence system. The spleen like the kidneys does not like cold/damp weather or too much cold or raw food – as this energetically saps strength from the spleen.

Those with a removed spleen; may find their immunity compromised although conventional medicine does not recognise this and commonly removes.

 

 

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The Brain – Gut Connection!

Both our gut and our brain originate early in embryogenesis from the same clump of tissue which divides during foetal development. While one section turns into the central nervous system, another piece migrates to become the enteric nervous system. Later the two nervous systems connect via a cable called the vagus nerve — the longest of all the cranial nerves whose name is derived from Latin, meaning “wandering.”  The vagus nerve meanders from the brain stem through the neck and finally ends up in the abdomen. There’s the brain-gut connection.

The gut’s brain, known as the enteric nervous system (ENS), is located in sheaths of tissue lining the oesophagus, stomach, small intestine and colon. Considered a single entity, it is packed with neurons, neurotransmitters and proteins that zap messages between neurons or support cells like those found in the brain.

Think why if you are nervous about a job interview…your stomach can get upset!

70 % of the immune system is in your gut.

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“Let food be thy medicine & let thy medicine be food” – Hippocrates

Hippocrates is considered the father of Western Medicine and lived from 460 BC to 377 BC. Some of his sage advice included, “Let food be thy medicine & let thy medicine be food.”

Picture of our healthy food table, from a recent video shoot!

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What is IMMUNITY?!

The Immune System

The Lymphatic System

About the Immune System

The immune system, which is made up of special cells, proteins, tissues, and organs, defends people against germs and microorganisms every day. In most cases, the immune system does a great job of keeping people healthy and preventing infections. But sometimes problems with the immune system can lead to illness and infection.

The immune system is the body’s defence against infectious organisms and other invaders. Through a series of steps called the immune response, the immune system attacks organisms and substances that invade body systems and cause disease.

The immune system is made up of a network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to protect the body. The cells involved are white blood cells, or leukocytes, which come in two basic types that combine to seek out and destroy disease-causing organisms or substances.

Leukocytes (white blood cells) are produced or stored in many locations in the body, including the thymus, spleen, and bone marrow. For this reason, they’re called the lymphoid organs. There are also clumps of lymphoid tissue throughout the body, primarily as lymph nodes, that house the leukocytes (white blood cells).

The leukocytes (white blood cells) circulate through the body between the organs and nodes via lymphatic vessels and blood vessels. In this way, the immune system works in a coordinated manner to monitor the body for germs or substances that might cause problems.

The two basic types of leukocytes are:

  1. phagocytes, cells that chew up invading organisms
  2. lymphocytes, cells that allow the body to remember and recognize previous invaders and help the body destroy them

A number of different cells are considered phagocytes. The most common type is the neutrophil, which primarily fights bacteria. If doctors are worried about a bacterial infection, they might order a blood test to see if a patient has an increased number of neutrophils triggered by the infection. Other types of phagocytes have their own jobs to make sure that the body responds appropriately to a specific type of invader.

The two kinds of lymphocytes are B lymphocytes and T lymphocytes. Lymphocytes start out in the bone marrow and either stay there and mature into B cells, or they leave for the thymus gland, where they mature into T cells. B lymphocytes and T lymphocytes have separate functions: B lymphocytes are like the body’s military intelligence system, seeking out their targets and sending defences to lock onto them. T cells are like the soldiers, destroying the invaders that the intelligence system has identified.

= T Cell                                 = B Cell

N. B

T- cells = A type of white blood cell that is of key importance to the immune system and is at the core of adaptive immunity and the system that tailors the body’s immune response to specific pathogens.

Immature T cells (termed T-stem cells) migrate to the thymus gland in the neck, where they mature and differentiate into various types of mature T cells and become active in the immune system. There are several different types of mature T cells. Not all of their functions are known. T cells can produce substances called cytokines such as the interleukins which further stimulate the immune response. T-cell activation is measured as a way to assess the health of patients with HIV/AIDS and less frequently in other disorders.

T cell are also known as T lymphocytes (white blood cells). The “T” stands for “thymus” — the organ in which these cells mature. As opposed to B cells which mature in the bone marrow.

Here’s how it works:

When antigens (foreign substances that invade the body) are detected, several types of cells work together to recognize them and respond. These cells trigger the B lymphocytes to produce antibodies, specialized proteins that lock onto specific antigens.

Once produced, these antibodies continue to exist in a person’s body, so that if the same antigen is presented to the immune system again, the antibodies are already there to do their job. So if someone gets ill with a certain disease, like chickenpox, that person typically does not get ill from it again.

Although antibodies can recognize an antigen and lock onto it, they are not capable of destroying it without help. That is the job of the T cells, which are part of the system that destroys antigens that have been tagged by antibodies or cells that have been infected or somehow changed. (Some T cells are actually called “killer cells.”) T cells also are involved in helping signal other cells (like phagocytes) to do their jobs.

Antibodies also can neutralize toxins (poisonous or damaging substances) produced by different organisms. Lastly, antibodies can activate a group of proteins called complement that are also part of the immune system. Complement assists in killing bacteria, viruses, or infected cells.

All of these specialized cells and parts of the immune system offer the body protection against disease. This protection is called immunity.

 

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Focus On: Kinesiology

What is Systematic Kinesiology?

Systematic Kinesiology (pronounced kin-easy-ology ) is a way of identifying any imbalances a person has by monitoring their ability to hold their muscles against light pressure.

Each muscle is related to an organ, and also to an energy pathway called a meridian. Together the muscle, organ and meridian form a circuit. If there are chemical, emotional, structural or energetic stresses affecting the circuit, the muscle tested will feel ‘spongy’, indicating an imbalance.

Once an imbalance is found the Kinesiologist uses the muscle test again to get feedback from the person’s body about what factors are aggravating the imbalance, and what will help to rebalance it. Here’s how it works …

Each time a relevant factor is introduced the muscle’s response changes, a bit like a switch. So imagine a spongy muscle as being ‘off’; if the person then thinks of an emotional stress and the muscle is suddenly able to hold against the pressure, i.e. it switches ‘on’, that indicates that that emotional stress in involved in that imbalance.

Similarly, if a particular nutrient, when placed in the mouth, causes the muscle to switch ‘on’, we know it will be helpful. The same process can be used to find related structural problems and energetic factors.

Based on this feedback the Kinesiologist and client can discover exactly what is involved in the imbalance and devise a treatment plan. It may include nutritional supplements, various emotional stress release techniques, Bach Flower remedies, acupressure, gentle structural realignment, chakra balancing, light touch, firm reflex massage, suggested lifestyle changes and more. The exact treatment you receive depends on the feedback your body gives through the muscle test about what it needs to return to health.

There is no guess work with Systematic Kinesiology.

History of Kinesiology

Dr George Goodheart, an American chiropractor, the acknowledged founder of kinesiology in 1964, used the model of muscle testing to evaluate what he was doing chiropractically. The model of muscle testing he used was developed in the 1930s by the husband and wife team of Kendal and Kendal (See ref 1).

Stanley Hoppenfeld MD who was assistant clinical professor of orthopaedic surgery at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine (U.S.) used muscle testing to evaluate the neurological function of the muscle (See ref 2).

In neurology textbooks muscle testing is defined as “a means of testing the motor function of limbs”. Therefore muscle testing was already accepted as a valid technique and used extensively in orthopaedic medicine by physiotherapists, chiropractors and osteopaths.

As interest grew in utilising this technique Dr Goodheart drew together a group of doctors who were also interested in developing this further and the International College of Applied Kinesiology (ICAK) was formed. As part of the foundation of expanding the application of muscle testing the team took on board work done by Bennet and Chapman with regard to the lymphatic system. They also looked at the subtle energy system as used within acupuncture.

This then was the basis of muscle testing that was to develop and become known as Applied Kinesiology (AK).

Dr John Thie, one of the original members of this research team, led by Dr Goodheart, recognised the need to educate the public in many of the self-help techniques within AK and this educational programme then became known as Touch For Health (TFH), a programme for the lay person and is taught and used throughout the world.

Today, Applied Kinesiology is regularly utilised by osteopaths, chiropractors and dentists. A pre-requisite for membership to ICAK both in the United States and in the United Kingdom is that the person can write medical prescriptions.

Systematic Kinesiology has expanded further from the concepts of TFH, but still uses and teaches techniques researched by the physicians of ICAK.

For the past 20 years Dr Sheldon Deal has given an annual seminar in London to kinesiologists on the new information and research accepted by ICAK. International Applied Kinesiology members meet twice a year and present research papers. Dr Deal was President of the college from 1978 – 1983 and after completing that term of office went on to the examining board and today holds the position of being the President of the examining board.

Dr Deal is also the technical advisor to the Association of Systematic Kinesiology.

What happens in Kinesiology treatment?

You can read all you like about Kinesiology but there is no substitute for trying it yourself. You’ll be amazed to see how it works. And, of course, you’ll begin to feel the benefits.

Your kinesiologist will first take a medical and lifestyle history. You can remain fully clothed in a Kinesiology session. The Kinesiologist will places your arms, legs or head into specific positions and then apply a light pressure. The quality of response to this pressure determines whether or not there is an imbalance in the muscle-organ-meridian circuit. A muscle test, as used by Kinesiologists, does not measure the raw physical strength. Imbalances even show up on body builders.

Muscle testing gives the Kinesiologist information and feedback from your body about its condition. Since our bodies accumulate imbalances in a certain order (see How illnesses develop), they will return to health quicker if the imbalances are treated in a certain order. Through muscle testing, a Kinesiologist can assess the order in which to treat the imbalances. Usually, once a priority imbalance has been treated, you will see that other related imbalances disappear immediately.

Based on feedback from the muscle test, you and the Kinesiologist can discover exactly what is involved in your imbalances and devise a treatment plan. It may include nutritional supplements, various emotional stress release techniques, Bach Flower remedies, acupressure, gentle structural realignment, chakra balancing, light touch, firm reflex massage, suggested lifestyle changes and more. The exact treatment you receive depends on the feedback your body gives through the muscle test about what it needs to return to health.

How many treatments?

This depends very much on your complaint, how long you’ve had it, and how fully you participate in your own treatment, i.e. making the recommended lifestyle and dietary changes that often form part of the treatment plan. Usually, however, most people experience an improvement in three to six visits. It is then recommended that you have routine balances two to three times a year

What can Systematic Kinesiology help?

Every health problem will have at least one imbalance. And every imbalance will have at least one component to it (chemical, mental, physical and energetic). Finding imbalances and treating holistically is what Systematic Kinesiology is all about, so it can help with just about anything :-

  • Accident trauma
  • Allergies
  • Arthritis
  • Asthma
  • Back ache
  • Breast pain and congestion
  • Depression
  • Digestive problems
  • Dyslexia
  • Fatigue
  • Food sensitivities
  • Irritable bowel syndrome
  • Learning difficulties
  • Muscular aches and pains
  • Osteoporosis
  • P.M.S., P.M.T.
  • Phobias
  • Post-operative pain
  • Postural problems
  • Rheumatism
  • Skin disorders

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Kinesiology FAQ

Kinesiology Facts

  • Kinesiology is a safe, natural, effective and complete complementary therapy.
  • It is a way of detecting imbalances in the body through muscle monitoring.
  • Kinesiology was devised by an American Chiropractor, Dr George Goodheart in 1964.
  • Brian Butler who set up the first school, The Academy of Systematic Kinesiology, brought it to the UK in 1975.
  • Through muscle monitoring you can quickly identify precisely what is involved in any imbalance found e.g. Nutritional deficiencies, hormonal imbalances, emotional upset, food sensitivities, structural misalignments, poor energy flow or negative beliefs.
  • Treatment is then given according to the feedback the person’s body gives via muscle monitoring.
  • It may include acupressure, light touch, nutrition, gentle manipulation (no clicking) Bach (or other) flower remedies, and/or energy balancing.
  • This holistic approach of simultaneously treating all the aspects of a person (emotional, nutritional, structural, and energetic) ensures a quicker, more thorough return to health.

Kinesiology Fallacies

  • Kinesiologists do not just use one muscle to test for imbalances. Each muscle is related to an organ or a gland, and so using one muscle would not give accurate results.
  • Systematic Kinesiology is not about asking the body verbal questions.
  • Kinesiologists do not diagnose. They find imbalances, and find out what will bring the body back into balance.

 

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Focus On: Scenar

What is Scenar?

Scenar Treatment

Scenar treatment is conducted with an electronic device; the Scenar weighs approximately 300grams, is 200mm in length, with an electrical contact at one end and runs off a 9V battery. This is run over the spine and abdomen or the infected area, recording the resistive response to its signals and using its sophisticated software to return a fresh signal. A gentle tingling/stroking sensation will be felt. The practitioner is looking for anomalies on the skin surface, which may be highlighted by redness, numbness, stickiness or a change in numerical display or sound. Although these areas may not seem to directly relate to the obvious symptom, by treating these ‘asymmetries’, (as the Russians call them), the healing process will commence.

Patients having Scenar treatment need to take responsibility for their health and are advised to participate actively in the treatment and recovery process. The chemical compounds, released by the nerves, affect not only the problem areas, but also circulate in the blood treating other areas of the body. This goes some way to explaining how old and often forgotten problems are brought to the surface for treatment.
The Russians state that a chronic problem that the patient has may take up to 6 weeks treatment, with long-lasting effectiveness. Acute problems may just take one or two treatments. They say that the Scenar proves effective in 80% of all cases, of which full recovery occurs in 2/3rds of them and significant healing in the remainder.

What conditions can Scenar treat?

In the UK, the devices are licensed by the British Standards Institute for pain relief only. However, because of the nature of the device, viz., stimulating the nervous system, the Russian experience is that Scenar affects all the body systems.
The Russian experience suggests that it can be effective for a very broad range of diseases, including diseases of the digestive, cardiovascular, respiratory, musculo-skeletal, urinary, reproductive and nervous systems.
It is also useful for managing ENT diseases, eye diseases, skin conditions and dental problems. It has also been found beneficial in burns, fractures, insect bites, allergic reactions, diseases of the blood and disorders involving immune mechanisms; endocrine, nutritional and metabolic disorders; stress and mental depression, etc.
It is known to give real relief from many types of pain.

How often will I need a treatment?

In order to create a continuous flow of circulating regulative peptides Scenar action must be given quite often. For any fresh injury or any acute inflammatory process treatment needs to be intensive, ideally once or even twice daily. For chronic conditions, treatments are ideally given three or four times a week initially. As things improve the frequency can be reduced.
A course of treatments will vary from individual to individual, and takes into account such factors as the stage of the pathological process, the person’s age, state of health, and so on.

Is it safe?

As the Scenar impulse is similar to endogenous nerve impulses, it is non-damaging and safe. Only people with cardiac pacemakers are not allowed to have Scenar treatment. see contra-indications. Children and pregnant women can be treated, and even animals enjoy it!

What about my conventional treatment?

If you are receiving treatment from your doctor it makes sense to inform him about Scenar therapy. Treatment with Scenar may enable you to reduce or even stop taking some medication, and this can be done under the supervision of your doctor.

What else do I need to know?

During the treatment of chronic conditions, occasionally a healing crisis may occur (experienced as a complete lack of energy and malaise). This arises if the body is getting rid of toxic energy too rapidly. There are techniques that can be used with the Scenar to manage this.
For best results it is advisable not to bathe or shower for two hours before and after treatment. It may be necessary to shave an area of skin to ensure good communication between the device and the nervous system.
Patients generally experience an increase in energy, more refreshing sleep and an improved well-being.

How does it differ from other therapies?

There are several ways in which it differs from other electrical therapies.
Unlike TENS machines, each impulse is different from the previous one so the body is unable to adapt to the signal.
The Scenar impulses change according to the response from the body at the exact moment of treatment. This allows a true bio-feedback dialogue to take place between the scenar device and the nervous system, resulting in stimulation of the A,B and C fibres – creating a cascade of neuropeptides amongst other healing entities of the bodies internal pharmacy. This massive response helps explain the effectiveness of Scenar therapy on the whole body.

 

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